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What book will you read next

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  1. #21

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    OP: Suggest you also Google "Jerry Pournelle California Sixth Grade Reader"


  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Natfixit:
    I was the same when I was ten years old, but reading biographies/modern history, but not the usual trashy stuff these days. Does he have an interest in social subjects? I was in Bookazine a couple of weeks ago and saw a second volume of , "the Book of General Ignorance." Also could be of interest to your lad.
    Me too. I just read absolutely anything I could get my hands on irrespective of whether it was meant for young people or not, from "famous five" through to my mum's magazines and their adult "romances".
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  3. #23

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    Come to think of it, I read animal farm for the first time on the plane back from Chengdu. While I have known about the book and its basic message for years, I had never actually read it. And there is was, on sale in a bookshop at Chengdu Airport. The irony! Anyway, its a tiny book (I had no idea it was so short really) and I read it in about 1.5 hours. I think he could have drawn the plot out a bit personally. Anyway, more of a "tick the box" than anything else. I did 1984 as my o level Eng Lit book. Along with Lord of the Flies - another book a young kid might like but with pretty adult messages.


  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by HK_Katherine:
    Me too. I just read absolutely anything I could get my hands on irrespective of whether it was meant for young people or not, from "famous five" through to my mum's magazines and their adult "romances".
    Ditto. I had all of the Famous Five plus Secret Seven series when I was in primary school, and when The Name of the Rose came out, I read that, too. Books by Nancy Cato and Colleen McCollough, Bruce Courtenay...Animal Farm and 1984 were books were part of our high school reading list, and To Kill a Mockingbird. Both of my late granddad's were avid readers. My paternal grandma had the piles of soppy womens' romance weeklies/monthlies....ugh, but I read them anyway.

    My husband is into Michael Connelly, J Nesbo and the Jack Reacher books.
    Last edited by Natfixit; 31-03-2016 at 10:05 AM.
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  5. #25
    Mamba

    Dahl, Crompton, Buchan read them. Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies went down a treat last year, he's just started 1984 which is blowing his mind. Which is what a great book should do.

    Twain, Blyton and other 'classics' like Swallows and Amazons just haven't seemed to resonate, as Lord Dashwood said they don't seem to have much relevance to a kid growing up as an international brat. Michael Morpurgo sent him reaching for the sick bag and he hates Hemingway.

    For younger kids the Charlie Small series is good, David Walliams is OK but I do wish that authors/publishers would stop churning out the same never ending story regurgitated in a billion sequels. The How to Train Your Dragon books, Harry bleeding Potter etc. He's a kid, he's not daft, he knows a formula when he reads one.

    Does anyone remember the books Willard Price did for kids? They were fantastic. Read them over and over until the covers fell off.

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  6. #26

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    Remember my eldest reading Tuck Everlasting when she was about 10 and it was thought provoking and we had a long chat about it.


  7. #27

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    OP: If you have no qualms about 1984 for your 10 year old, may I also suggest Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey-Maturin Series. 20 volumes ought to keep him busy for a while.

    On a related note. Several posters have mentioned it being difficult for an expat kid in Hong Kong in 2015 to relate to this or that time or place. Well, yes... but without forcing the kid to read stuff he doesn't like, surely one of the main points of literature is to expose us (note I didn't say open our minds) to other people and other places and other times?

    A few things to consider here:

    (1) Those who don't read, limit their intellectual stimulation to only those people around them and alive at the same time. (I'm not even going to talk about TV/Movies/Youtube - mostly crap).

    (2) Too many people suffer from the misconception that they are necessarily smarter than those who have gone before. Far from it.

    (3) It's very important to have some tenuous sense of the vastness of what one doesn't know - and what other so-called experts and pundits don't know but are wallpapering over. Can't be done without having read widely.

    Finally, Cultural Literacy. A term which shouldn't even have to exist. But here we are. The eponymous book is by E. D. Hirsch. A good guide to the very barest bones of what a child should know before heading off to university.

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  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mamba:
    Dahl, Crompton, Buchan read them. Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies went down a treat last year, he's just started 1984 which is blowing his mind. Which is what a great book should do.

    Twain, Blyton and other 'classics' like Swallows and Amazons just haven't seemed to resonate, as Lord Dashwood said they don't seem to have much relevance to a kid growing up as an international brat. Michael Morpurgo sent him reaching for the sick bag and he hates Hemingway.

    For younger kids the Charlie Small series is good, David Walliams is OK but I do wish that authors/publishers would stop churning out the same never ending story regurgitated in a billion sequels. The How to Train Your Dragon books, Harry bleeding Potter etc. He's a kid, he's not daft, he knows a formula when he reads one.

    Does anyone remember the books Willard Price did for kids? They were fantastic. Read them over and over until the covers fell off.
    Maybe too young for the horror genre...I went through that phase in my early teens I think...King, Herbert, Koontz..............but what about Fantasy...Tollken maybe a bit much at ten but how about Raymond E. Feist? The Magician is still one of my most fondly remembered epics....I actually regretted reading that series first as it was a standard I held all other books of the genre against and none came close imo...

  9. #29
    Mamba

    @East_coast sorry for hijacking the thread.

    @Kinch he's not your average camper, so no qualms about 1984, we talk through it and contextualise. He loved the Master and Commander series so your Patrick O'Brien suggestion looks good, not heard of it.

    In terms of relevancy to kids growing up in HK he's grown up everywhere, lived in 7 countries, the main issue is with finding the voice of the author. Just in the same way I don't expect to connect or enjoy every book I read I don't expect him to either, what I do expect is to respect that the voice is valid and relate it to the time and place it's set.

    @hullexile Tuck Everlasting looks good, we have a lot of random conversations about immortality, will give it a go, as long as the romance stuff isn't too much. He loved the Wrinkle in Time series until it got mushy. He's 10, he has his limits.

    @lordDashwood he's read Tolkein except for Tree and Leaf, the only problem he had with it was that the Lord of the Rings is such a huge, heavy book he couldn't hold it for too long!

    Horror stuff he's starting slowly on but we're taking the your imagination will be more scary than anything you read in the pages of a book, once you read it you can't unread it stance. However, we get the Fortean Times every month as I'm a sucker for the weird and unusual.


  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mamba:
    @Kinch he's not your average camper, so no qualms about 1984, we talk through it and contextualise.
    Might be interesting to ask him if he's noticed any cases at school of there being things he's not allowed to say or situations where everyone is expected to affirm that apples are in fact oranges.

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