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  1. #51

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    "I think that is why the phrase English as an Additional Language is used. A good phrase, which seems to show respect for both languages."


    In the US it is called "ESOL" which stands for "English for speakers of other languages." It used to be "English as a second language" ("ESL") but ESOL was deemed more accurate, more respectful, not sure. Also many of the children and adults learning English speak several languages so "second" was incorrect. It's been in use for at least 10 years or so...probably closer to 20.

    My daughter's old school district:

    https://www.fcps.edu/academics/acade...languages-esol
    Last edited by MABinPengChau; 08-11-2018 at 06:15 PM.
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  2. #52

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    Ee-zed

    One of the oddities of HK English is the pronunciation of the last letter of the alphabet.

    A good explanation I have heard is that when children learn to recite the alphabet, they merge the last two letters: "Why-ee-zed."

    But I have recently come across this rhyming couplet written by Christopher Smart in the 1750s:

    Oh! how we warble in our gizzards,
    With X X's, H H's and with Z Z's.
    And I have read that in some dialects, Z is or once was pronounced "izzard". So the HK pronunciation may not be as odd as it seems.

  3. #53

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    In HK when spelling my name, if there is any confusion I go directly to the HK-F as in eh-foo

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  4. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiona in HKG
    go directly to the HK-F as in eh-foo
    You need to go Full-Hongkie when pronouncing SF-Express:

    Es-sy Ef-foo Ex-sy Pres-sy (8 syllables instead of 4)

  5. #55

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    Turnstiles

    People have been jumping over turnstiles at MTR stations - but they aren't turnstiles, they're gates. The word remains, though the thing has gone. 'Turnstile' now appears to mean 'any barrier that one has to pass through, usually by paying, in order to reach a certain venue'.

    The word 'turnstile' preserves an old word from the countryside, 'stile' - which is a simple ladder fixed to a fence so that one can climb over it. One or two people on Geoexpat have mis-spelt the word 'turnstyle'.

    It's not uncommon for words to remain in use, though the thing has gone, or changed. For example, 'steamroller'. Where's the steam?

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  6. #56
    jgl
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    Many of them are still turnstiles. And turnstyle is acceptable spelling.


  7. #57

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    Claire - I wonder who you have been talking to. Not even the most ignorant rednecks I know talk like that.


  8. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl
    And turnstyle is acceptable spelling.
    Absolutely

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  9. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl
    Many of them are still turnstiles. And turnstyle is acceptable spelling.
    First sentence: Thank you for the correction. On which line or lines are there turnstiles?

    Second sentence: No, definitely not. As I wrote, it comes from the old word 'stile'. If you Google 'turnstyle', you'll see it's the name of some companies and of a band. Changing the spelling is an amusing play on words.

  10. #60
    jgl
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    Central. Lots of other stations which currently escape me, but the irritating need to hip-bump through various parts of the HK MTR system to stick in the mind.

    I'm quite aware of the word "stile" thank you. Since at least the beginning of high school. And yet turnstyle does appear to be in common usage, enough that I'm not fussed over it.


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