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Schools or Universities/Colleges?

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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile
    Yes the LSE, but they would still say they went to University at the London School of Economics.

    For once though I agree with mlew.
    Wrong, the quote is from interviews and the word university was not used.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by TigerSun
    Wrong, the quote is from interviews and the word university was not used.
    Not wrong. Did they say they went to school? Or to the London School of Economics? The latter is its name. It is totally unimportant but take it from the Brits here that we go to university not school in the same way we walk on pavements and wear trousers.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile
    Not wrong. Did they say they went to school? Or to the London School of Economics? The latter is its name. It is totally unimportant but take it from the Brits here that we go to university not school in the same way we walk on pavements and wear trousers.
    I totally believe you, Brits dont want to admit university is a school. My issue is them telling the rest of the English world that we are wrong in our (correct ) usage of a word.
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  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by TigerSun
    The poster was correcting a Chinese speaker as to an error in usage.
    It might be an error in London but not especially in Hong Kong.

    There are a 1/4 million Canadians here and many Americans and for us, university is simply another school and we can figure out the context of its use without confusion. When a engineer asks an accountant where he went to school, we know he's not talking about kindergarten.
    It was relevant to this particular discussion though. A 16 yr old going through this far different from a 20 yr old.

  5. #15

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    There are degree-conferring post-secondary schools like VTC, which are not "universities". So may be our friend is such a student. The traditional university institution is transforming and he may loosely be considered a university student. Who is to quibble other than employers?


  6. #16

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    I've lived and worked in the UK and went to SCHOOL at one of their "universities" and I find myself slowly being driven insane by UK English. The worst is when an American starts doing a Madonna. Had a colleague from OHIO state that a client had "thrown a wobbly."

    "Whilst!"

    "Maths!"

    I take great pride fighting a determined rearguard action against "whilst." What are you, a 19th-century Cockney bootblack?

    "Please guvna, hold me brush WHILST I gets in me chimbney, I does."
    \

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  7. #17

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    In American English you can use the term "school" for anything up to and including university. They are just different levels of schools. My university consisted of several colleges and schools, including the School of Medicine, School of Education, etc.

    In British English school always means primary/secondary.

    In HK people pick up different English influences depending on what school they attend, where their parents are from or studied, etc so being pedantic about this on Geoexpat is kind of obnoxious.


  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by merchantms
    In American English you can use the term "school" for anything up to and including university. They are just different levels of schools. My university consisted of several colleges and schools, including the School of Medicine, School of Education, etc.

    In British English school always means primary/secondary.

    In HK people pick up different English influences depending on what school they attend, where their parents are from or studied, etc so being pedantic about this on Geoexpat is kind of obnoxious.
    It is not really being pedantic. More confusion caused by language difference. In the thread that this discussion came from the OP said their boyfriend was on their way to school which to the Brits on here meant the boyfriend was young - a schoolchild.

    Neither usage is right or wrong just different. Non Brits telling Brits what they say in the UK is weird though.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile
    It is not really being pedantic. More confusion caused by language difference. In the thread that this discussion came from the OP said their boyfriend was on their way to school which to the Brits on here meant the boyfriend was young - a schoolchild.

    Neither usage is right or wrong just different. Non Brits telling Brits what they say in the UK is weird though.
    It's obvious in context - do you think there is any secondary school in HK with a 23 year old student? Obviously it's a post-secondary institution. Sorry I don't believe anyone is so thick to misunderstand this.

    I lived in the UK 10 years and it drove me crazy that people would act like they can't understand Americanisms when if they thought about it for 5 seconds they'd understand. It's snobbery. For example, pointing at dark red vegetable saying "beets." Response "WHAT?! WHICH ONE? BEETS? WHAT IS THAT?"
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  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by merchantms
    It's obvious in context - do you think there is any secondary school in HK with a 23 year old student? Obviously it's a post-secondary institution. Sorry I don't believe anyone is so thick to misunderstand this.

    I lived in the UK 10 years and it drove me crazy that people would act like they can't understand Americanisms when if they thought about it for 5 seconds they'd understand. It's snobbery. For example, pointing at dark red vegetable saying "beets." Response "WHAT?! WHICH ONE? BEETS? WHAT IS THAT?"
    Um we didn't know he was 23 until afterwards, which is why I asked his age to check my understanding. Calm down. Do Americans never make fun of UK English, of course they do.

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