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Hollywood actors, CEOs charged in US college admissions scandal

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  1. #1

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    Hollywood actors, CEOs charged in US college admissions scandal

    Hollywood actors, CEOs accused of paying bribes, faking photos to scam U.S. college admissions
    Nearly 50 people, including actors Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were charged on Tuesday in what federal authorities say was a $25 million scam to help wealthy Americans get their children into elite universities like Yale and Stanford.
    William Rick Singer, 58, pleaded guilty on Tuesday to charges related to running the scheme through his Edge College & Career Network, which charged from $100,000 to as much as $2.5 million per child for the services,...
    I was essentially buying or bribing the coaches for a spot, Singer said as he pleaded guilty to charges including racketeering, money laundering and obstruction of justice. And that occurred very frequently.
    https://twitter.com/KatyLand1985/sta...67783692075008
    MABinPengChau likes this.

  2. #2

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    Not surprised. At all.


  3. #3

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    Well George W definitely didn't get into Yale because he was smart!


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    I'm surprised that's actually illegal


  5. #5

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    Reaction on the US websites like Yahoo is "Duh!" There are always spots reserved for athletes who don't need to have the same grades as regular candidates.

    And this is a major reason my daughter applied in the UK because the US system is so bizarre where you have to be student government president, do a few sports, and start your own charity to be admitted to top schools- or just be an athlete.

    Here is one response from Bloomberg:

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/coach...204723117.html

    They say that a "radical" solution would be to NOT consider athletic ability in college admissions...LOL.

    "The more radical solution would be to take the route of Oxford and Cambridge universities, which dont consider athletic ability at all in their admissions decisions. Somehow those universities have managed to survive for almost a millennium each without it. Both universities field numerous sports teams. The athletic standard is often much lower than at a U.S. university (though not always). That doesnt detract from the pleasure that students take in participating."


  6. #6

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    This isn't about athletes. It's about wealthy people cheating.

    - students being recruited for sports that they do not even play
    - paying exam proctors to change answers or provide answers
    - doctors giving fake diagnoses of ADD/ADHD to allow extra time in exams

    There are a lot of problems in the US university system and I hope this case highlights some of them, but we need to keep in mind these people were engaged in cheating, fraud, and bribery - actual crimes - not just standard run of mill "give a donation to the library" stuff.

    I am glad to see wealthy powerful people being charged for crimes that they probably assumed they could get away with.


  7. #7

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    Charged doesn't necessarily mean they won't get away with it!

    Kowloon Goon likes this.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by si0001
    Charged doesn't necessarily mean they won't get away with it!
    True but their names are out there, some of been fired or put on leave from their jobs already, and can you imagine how the classmates of those students are treating them knowing how they got accepted...

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by merchantms
    This isn't about athletes. It's about wealthy people cheating.

    - students being recruited for sports that they do not even play
    - paying exam proctors to change answers or provide answers
    - doctors giving fake diagnoses of ADD/ADHD to allow extra time in exams

    There are a lot of problems in the US university system and I hope this case highlights some of them, but we need to keep in mind these people were engaged in cheating, fraud, and bribery - actual crimes - not just standard run of mill "give a donation to the library" stuff.

    I am glad to see wealthy powerful people being charged for crimes that they probably assumed they could get away with.

    It's about athletics to the extent that there exists a system where the coach can dictate who gets in, even if they don't have the grades- if the system did not exist, there would be no way to bribe the coach to say that these kids should be "on the team."

    If the system were only about academic qualifications, these kinds of schemes could not exist in the first place.

    Yes, there were other bits about scores but it was mostly through athletic admissions.

    This is why I liked my university- we had NO athletic scholarships of any kind and NO legacy admissions (because your parent went there). So average students, not pro athletes in training, could actually play sports. For us, football was a club sport that mostly played against high school teams. No one ever went to watch the games. The athletic facilities were mainly for use by STUDENTS who wanted to relax by playing a few sports. So dormitories would arrange teams and play against other dormitories in a fun, relaxing environment. Which is more what the sports were originally for at universities.

  10. #10

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    Yes, there were other bits about scores but it was mostly through athletic admissions.
    It was a huge part of the story.

    Singer also orchestrated scenarios under which students took tests overseen by test administrators at two locations, at a public high school in Houston and at a private college prep school in West Hollywood, Calif. Federal prosecutors say Singer paid administrators Niki Williams (in Houston) and Igor Dvorskiy (in California) bribes of as much as $10,000 per test.

    To ensure a high score, Singer allegedly arranged for a third person "to take the exams in place of the students, to give the students the correct answers during the exams, or to correct the students' answers" after they took the test, the Justice Department said. That role allegedly was often played by 36-year-old Mark Riddell of Palmetto, Fla.

    "Singer's clients paid him between $15,000 and $75,000 per test, with the payments structured as purported donations" to a purported charity that Singer controlled, the Justice Department said. "In many instances, the students taking the exams were unaware that their parents had arranged for the cheating."

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