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Does Hong Kong slowly change one's mannerism?

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  1. #1

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    Nov 2015
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    Does Hong Kong slowly change one's mannerism?

    Do people act differently from how they were back home? When you shove your way through a small crowd of people to get to the middle of the MTR, you know you are converted. 'Ngm goi' and 'excuse me' are overrated in this city. Ah, happy days.


  2. #2

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    Jan 2010
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    I'm certainly saying "Please" and "Thank you" way less than before

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  3. #3

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    Jun 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrgoodkat
    I'm certainly saying "Please" and "Thank you" way less than before
    I still find myself naturally saying thank you as a customer as if its reciprocal. Similar to a shop keeper saying thank you and responding with you are welcome (or thank you). However, I am amazed at how many places simply hand you your change and say nothing.

    I stopped holding doors open for people behind me unless they are elderly or handicapped or obviously have their hands full carrying a bulky or heavy item with both hands. The last straws were even helpers treating me like a hotel doorman and people walking into the elevator before I even got out. Just overall selfishness of people.
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  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Nah, I still retain mine - like I clear my own tray at McD, thank the minibus driver, offer to share umbrella, open elevator doors, stand on right on escalators, stand in middle of MTR train cabins, when walking with a girl stand on the side closest to road, dont talk on phone at theatres, etc

    shri, tf19, Kowloon Goon and 9 others like this.

  5. #5

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    Jan 2010
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    Hong Kong has always been crowded even before the influx of Mainlanders so people here can be excused if pushing comes to shoving at times. I travel often and judge local people on how they treat each other on public transportation, ie whether young people give up their seats. I think Hongkers are average meaning no they do not readily give up their seats. I spend a lot of time in the mainland and they get top rating which means it is standard practice to give up their seat. Singapore and Malaysia rate very high. Seoul is worse than HK. Young people in Taipei regularly give up their seats rating higher than the mainland. I am surprised about Tokyo. Last week coming from Yokohama a frail and old woman got on the train and no one gave her a seat so I stood up. I also saw young Japanese occupying seats meant for people in need. Their society is changing I guess. The most polite has to be the Vietnamese. They do not have metros but I saw the entire bus full of young people stood up to offer their seats when women with kids came on board.


  6. #6

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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMDNC
    I still find myself naturally saying thank you as a customer as if its reciprocal. Similar to a shop keeper saying thank you and responding with you are welcome (or thank you). However, I am amazed at how many places simply hand you your change and say nothing.

    I stopped holding doors open for people behind me unless they are elderly or handicapped or obviously have their hands full carrying a bulky or heavy item with both hands. The last straws were even helpers treating me like a hotel doorman and people walking into the elevator before I even got out. Just overall selfishness of people.
    When I first moved to Hong Kong I used to physically push people out of the way with my arms when they enter into the MTR car before I had a chance to get out. I still do that but only with my shoulders. I will try to modify my behaviour.
    Last edited by jonastainine; 12-09-2019 at 10:52 AM.

  7. #7

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    Mar 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMDNC
    The last straws were even helpers treating me like a hotel doorman
    Nice one. Bloody helpers, acting like they're regular people...

  8. #8

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    Jun 2006
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    I had thought I was unchanged until one year I returned to the UK at New Years, and proceeded to go round the bars on New Years eve with a group of friends. We had just arrived at one bar and I walked in, went up to the bar and started ordering, before I realised the rest of the group was still outside discussing whether to skip that bar as it was too crowded to even get in the door

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  9. #9

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    Mar 2015
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    In Yuen Long, where I live, my manners are impeccable. I know that if I ever snap at anyone, 100 people will see a giant foreigner attacking a poor wee local and will file me under 'Arsehole Gweilo' forever. I have to be good all the time, and I reap the rewards of that with scores of friendly shopkeeprs and others who goi out of their way to interact with me.
    In other parts of HK, I'm a shoulder-dropping, foul-mouthed, antisocial arse.

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  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by juanalias
    Nice one. Bloody helpers, acting like they're regular people...
    I know it may come across as negative in not treating them as fellow human beings but was not meant that way. More along the lines that they come from a more polite country with Western influence and that the norms in HK were different and as visitors they adapted the norms of not opening doors or saying thank you. As a result I neeed to get with the norms.
    juanalias and Kowloon Goon like this.

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