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Quantas grounded worldwide

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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by pin:
    Moving, can you explain how this is all the Aussie government's fault?
    It's not ALL their fault, but the government is in the pocket of the unions which means that the unions think they can get away with murder and so were trying to do so. The current labor government also dialled back a number of the IR reforms the previous (liberal) government had made. So it didn't help.

    In terms of the "power" in Australia between Government, company management and the unions, it's one of those places in the world where the unions are still very powerful (less so than in the past, when they basically ruled the workplace, but still pretty powerful). Also pretty intransigent.

    This dispute, as far as I can tell, is about people fighting tooth and nail to keep entitlements that belonged to a different era (before Qantas was privatised and before the significant introduction of competition in the airline business); protectionism of jobs for Australians and not allowing any to move to Asia and a management trying to survive in an era of budget airlines. It's a tough business these days. Virgin Blue, being a "new" airline, were able to strike much more competitive deals with their unions while Qantas was stuck with workplace agreements from the past that they could not unravel. (in laymans terms, Qantas were paying staff, even new people, more than Virgin and were not "allowed" to change this, nor lay people off).

  2. #22

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    Original Post Deleted
    Ohhh you're such a softy....You almost made me cry with that line.

    c'mon you big boy!

  3. #23

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    It would appear that the market also sees this as a win for Qantas.
    Cookies must be enabled | The Australian


  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by MovingIn07:
    Several parts of this assessment are inaccurate.

    Firstly - that he took this decision alone (implied in the word "leader"). Something of this magnitude would not be possible under australian corporate governance without the approval of the Board. So I don't think you can say it was a decision taken lightly or alone.

    Secondly - that Qantas has alienated tens of thousands of KEY customers. Qantas may have pissed off alot of passengers, but that's quite different to alienating KEY customers. They have been losing money on the international routes for years - so all those cheap backpackers and families stuck in airports around the world are not actually key customers. They are collateral damage. The KEY customers are the business sector, mainly in Australia and on key international routes, who had started avoiding Qantas because the months of strikes (usually without much warning) had made flying on Qantas too risky. So, those KEY customers had already been alienated, by the strikers. Those KEY customers are also typically business people who understand the operating environment in Australia and understand that something had to be done. I suspect they are hoping that those KEY customers will now take a rational assessment of the situation, recognise that the problem is fixed and start flying Qantas again.

    There are no guarantees of anything, but at the end of the day it's a business not a charity and I think they took the decision in the best, long term, interests of the company, not the government, not the tourist industry and not any individual passengers.
    I agree it's actually a smart move on the part of Qantas to force the union and the gov to the table. Then again, I haven't flown with Qantas in ages, whatever problems Cathay has, I know one thing for sure, they treat passengers better than Qantas. My Aussie colleagues are telling me that the unions are becoming ever more militant, so this serves them right.

    But, the long term interest of an airline company is also tied to some extent to the tourist industry, goverenment and KEY passenger themselves. Those KEY customers have already fled to Singapore Airlines, Cathay Pacific and others, and I don't think they will be coming back to Qantas soon.
    Last edited by Watercooler; 31-10-2011 at 11:53 AM.

  5. #25

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    I like this comment from their latest update:

    "you can again book Qantas flights with confidence."

    But of course - who would ever doubt it!


  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by pudcat:
    I like this comment from their latest update:

    "you can again book Qantas flights with confidence."

    But of course - who would ever doubt it!
    But this IS the point. Nobody has been able to book a qantas flight "with confidence" for months because of the wildcat industrial action! I'm sure none of the backpackers in London had any clue about this - they just choose their flights by price - but most of the travelling Aussie public was getting intimately familiar with these disruptions.....

  7. #27

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    Min is on the spot here. It is also emerging that the transport minister and pm were in frequent contact with qantas on the ongoing issue. The PM also received a call which she didn't respond to.

    it has been a royal pain travelling domestically with flights being changed at short notice and having to rearrange meetings.

    The timing also gives a clue. the started the grounding on a weekend (leisure travellers) not a weekday (business travellers).

    MovingIn07 likes this.

  8. #28

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    Isn't it just amazing that a beast such as this can take off?
    Video - Qantas A380 back in the air - The Sydney Morning Herald

    Amazing engineering