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Data: Road Casualty in Britain over 11 years - mapped

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  1. #1

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    Data: Road Casualty in Britain over 11 years - mapped

    See The Guardian

    It's both fascinating and disturbing. I find myself zooming in one road junctions and wondering, did I know that cyclist who died.

    But, my main question is, why isn't that data available in Hong Kong? In the UK it's available from a police dataset. Wouldn't Hong Kong have the same data?

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  2. #2

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    I am not sure why this isn't done in HK but not everyone in the world counts traffic fatalities the same way. I did some of this work in road safety for a Central American country and their way of counting meant practically that the death wasn't on the road itself it didn't get picked up as a road safety death.

    The Global Road Safety Partnership was developed in part by the UK gov't and Royal Dutch Shell. MP Barry Shearman was the key Brit MP on the initial committees.

    Their stats are quite broad too.

    I used to do speeches and remind people that 57000 + plus Americans died in the Vietnam War while they were killing that many a year on the streets of American MV crashes! Now it is down significantly.

    Every 30 seconds a person is killed in a road crash - more than 3000 per day - and almost 1.2 million people per year dying in road crashes worldwide. As many as 50 million are injured.

    More than eighty five per cent of the road traffic deaths and injuries occur in low income and middle income countries, yet they own only some 40 per cent of the world's motor vehicles.

    Police records seriously under-report crash and casualty numbers. In some countries, less than half of the deaths that happen as a result of a road crash are reported to the police.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) forecasts that by 2020 road crashes will be the third most common cause of premature death in the world and the annual number of deaths are forecast to be double the number today (2006) unless action is taken.
    Facts and figures of a global crisis

    This shows rank order changes in the causes of death in the world:

    1990 - road deaths were ranked at number 9.
    2020 - road deaths will move to number 3.

    War from number 20 in 90 to 15 in 2020.

    The economic drain on economies and communities is massive due to mv crashes.

    http://www.grsproadsafety.org/themes...O%20tables.pdf

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Football16:
    I am not sure why this isn't done in HK but not everyone in the world counts traffic fatalities the same way]

    i may come across as flippant..

    but surely the answer is dead people killed in traffic or due to traffic?
    and that should include if it happens a week later or due to related events

    for sure cars are underrated killers. yet prolific..
    Last edited by audiot; 19-11-2011 at 12:36 AM.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by audiot:
    i may come across as flippant..

    but surely the answer is dead people killed in traffic or due to traffic?
    and that should include if it happens a week later or due to related events

    for sure cars are underrated killers. yet prolific..
    You are not being flippant. This country I worked for did not count it as a road death if the person did not die with 14 days of the crash and others around the world are or were similar. I am not in that business any more so not sure how much progress on accurate counting there is getting all countries to have the same criteria.

  5. #5

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    In Japan I was led to believe that death occurring 24 HOURS after an accident was not included in the figures!


  6. #6

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    There are statistics available in Hong Kong, but it appears to be only in pdf format. See Transport Stats. if the raw data was available online, then something like the map for the whole of the UK could, I'd imagine, be made available in Hong Kong. The same idea goes for almost any type of statistic than the government collects about us. At the moment it is often only used by that specific department for one specific use. When it is made available to everyone, it can be made much more accessible (see the map above as an example and compare to the pdf files in HK) to people at large.


  7. #7

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    In today's (20 November, 2011) Sunday Morning Post, page 6.(google "We're finally taking the road to a safer city") and you should get the story.

    While this story is slightly different as it is considering new roads, I think the quote from the government spokesman is telling.

    The first safety audit of a proposed new road in the city will be carried out by the government....
    If the pilot scheme is a success, safety audits - common practice in much of the developed world - could be adopted for all new roads in Hong Kong.

    The first audit will be carried out on the proposed Central-Kowloon route running via Yau Ma Tei to Kai Tak. Engineers and road safety activists hailed the initiative. Julian Kwong Tse-hin, chairman of Community for Road Safety, said many roads in Hong Kong were poorly designed and some had metal barriers which could not withstand a collision, leading to more serious crashes.

    Vincent Chan Man-hong, of the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation, said he did not believe Hong Kong's roads were particularly unsafe, but added: "With road safety audits, the chance of having traffic accidents can be further reduced."

    The audits cover the layout of the road, bends, gradients, barriers, road signs and even drainage and are carried out by an independent team.

    The Transport Department employed consultants to start studying the possibilities of introducing road safety audits for Hong Kong as early as 2000.

    A department spokesman could not say why it had taken so long to adopt the system.
    If the data was made freely available, we would not have to worry about government departments dragging their feet.