Like Tree736Likes

Consequences of Brexit?

  1. #1151

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    猴山
    Posts
    13,600
    Quote Originally Posted by stickyears
    What about this one?

    The analysis in this document comes to a clear central conclusion: a vote to leave would represent an immediate and profound shock to our economy. That shock would push our economy into a recession and lead to an increase in unemployment of around 500,000, GDP would be 3.6% smaller, average real wages would be lower, inflation higher, sterling weaker, house prices would be hit and public borrowing would rise compared with a vote to remain.
    These findings sit within the range of what is now an overwhelming weight of published estimates for this short-term impact, which all find that UK GDP would be lower following a vote to leave.
    The analysis also presents a downside scenario, finding that the shock could be much more profound, meaning the effect on the economy would be worse still. The rise in uncertainty could be amplified, the volatility in financial markets more tumultuous, and the extent of the impact to living standards more acute. In this severe scenario, GDP would be 6% smaller, there would be a deeper recession, and the number of people made unemployed would rise by around 800,000 compared with a vote to remain. The hit to wages, inflation, house prices and borrowing would be larger. There is a credible risk that this more acute scenario could materialise.


    The more abhorrent pitches by the remain camp were the association of racism with mainstream Brexit voters. Some still believe.

    https://metro.co.uk/2017/12/21/peopl...finds-7176198/

    Both sides were a bit loose with their integrity but the Remain campaign was lacklustre and lacked a narrative apart from fear of a calamitous collapse. As it turned out the majority of the public didn't think the politicians were as inept as they were being told they were by the politicians in terms of managing the future outside the E.U.

    The UK is a parliamentary democracy. On significant matters of constitutional change a referendum is the least worst option. The details of laws are debated by elected representatives and voted on accordingly. It can be far from pretty and mistakes are made but the can be corrected also with subsequent new laws.

  2. #1152

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    猴山
    Posts
    13,600
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit
    That must have been on a really big bus.
    I think it was a bendy bus

  3. #1153

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    猴山
    Posts
    13,600

    Watching the UK's PMQs at the moment. Corbyn still appears pro-brexit