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Consequences of Brexit?

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  1. #1411

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    The current UK cabinet at least appear united in their approach of brinkmanship for now. They are also changing the narrative from May's deal to the EU offer. This means it would be even harder to pass through Parliament in it current state.

    Will anyone blink in this high stakes game of Chicken?


  2. #1412

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    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast
    The current UK cabinet at least appear united in their approach of brinkmanship for now. They are also changing the narrative from May's deal to the EU offer. This means it would be even harder to pass through Parliament in it current state.

    Will anyone blink in this high stakes game of Chicken?

    Someone will, unless they are ready to accept the tough economic consequences of a hard brexit. Of course, that is assuming they will indeed pull back from the brink. Sometimes, because of varying circumstances, everyone will careen off the cliff despite their best intentions.

  3. #1413

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    I've been a bit out of it for a few weeks, except to watch in bemused horror as another big country stumbles into idiocracy. (Was this how the world stumbled into the previous great wars- " Oh, how funny that that irrelevant thing happened way over there, but there's no way it could lead to anything unpleasant, could it?? No?")

    So to the various Brits here, what's the likely course of events?
    1. Boris again tries to get a vote for no-deal through Parliament,
    2. not allowed to raise the topic by the Speaker since it's already been voted on,
    3. Boris waffles around till Oct'31st.
    4. EU finally tires and doesn't extend the deadline, (maybe just to get rid of Farage)
    5. the UK falls out without a deal
    6. Scotland and Ireland go berserk?


  4. #1414

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    Quote Originally Posted by Apjace
    I've been a bit out of it for a few weeks, except to watch in bemused horror as another big country stumbles into idiocracy. (Was this how the world stumbled into the previous great wars- " Oh, how funny that that irrelevant thing happened way over there, but there's no way it could lead to anything unpleasant, could it?? No?")

    So to the various Brits here, what's the likely course of events?
    1. Boris again tries to get a vote for no-deal through Parliament,
    2. not allowed to raise the topic by the Speaker since it's already been voted on,
    3. Boris waffles around till Oct'31st.
    4. EU finally tires and doesn't extend the deadline, (maybe just to get rid of Farage)
    5. the UK falls out without a deal
    6. Scotland and Ireland go berserk?
    All options are still on the table I think. Markets seem to think a no-deal Brexit is getting closer if Sterling is a proxy for that view.
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  5. #1415

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    Quote Originally Posted by Apjace
    I've been a bit out of it for a few weeks, except to watch in bemused horror as another big country stumbles into idiocracy. (Was this how the world stumbled into the previous great wars- " Oh, how funny that that irrelevant thing happened way over there, but there's no way it could lead to anything unpleasant, could it?? No?")

    So to the various Brits here, what's the likely course of events?
    1. Boris again tries to get a vote for no-deal through Parliament,
    2. not allowed to raise the topic by the Speaker since it's already been voted on,
    3. Boris waffles around till Oct'31st.
    4. EU finally tires and doesn't extend the deadline, (maybe just to get rid of Farage)
    5. the UK falls out without a deal
    6. Scotland and Ireland go berserk?
    1. Unlikely as he knows it would be defeated
    2. It was May's deal that was voted on several times and the Speaker blocked
    3. Likely but we would have to see what the result of that will be
    4. Who knows
    5. Possible
    6. Scotland are very likely to go for an independence referendum again. Do you mean N.Ireland? Bloodshed is very likely. Many innocent people could die because the Tories wanted to keep power.
    Apjace likes this.

  6. #1416

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    Quote Originally Posted by Apjace
    I've been a bit out of it for a few weeks, except to watch in bemused horror as another big country stumbles into idiocracy. (Was this how the world stumbled into the previous great wars- " Oh, how funny that that irrelevant thing happened way over there, but there's no way it could lead to anything unpleasant, could it?? No?")

    So to the various Brits here, what's the likely course of events?
    1. Boris again tries to get a vote for no-deal through Parliament,
    2. not allowed to raise the topic by the Speaker since it's already been voted on,
    3. Boris waffles around till Oct'31st.
    4. EU finally tires and doesn't extend the deadline, (maybe just to get rid of Farage)
    5. the UK falls out without a deal
    6. Scotland and Ireland go berserk?

    1. Boris again tries to get a vote for no-deal through Parliament, There has already been a vote for a no deal Brexit as the fallback option to triggering Article 50. Parliament must find a way to stop it happening rather than Boris. He will probably find ways to stop them finding ways to stop him
    2. not allowed to raise the topic by the Speaker since it's already been voted on. That was the current EU offer. Now too toxic
    3. Boris waffles around till Oct'31st. That would appear the most likely
    4. EU finally tires and doesn't extend the deadline, (maybe just to get rid of Farage) That would appear the most likely
    5. the UK falls out without a deal That would appear the most likely
    6. Scotland and Ireland go berserk Ireland will take an economic hit and Ms Sturgeons requests for a referendum will be turned down until after the UK / EU have agreed the actual state of the future relationship.
    Apjace likes this.

  7. #1417

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    Q2 2019 GDP declined 0.2%. Pound fell again


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    Jamie Oliver still blames Brexit as one of the reasons for his restaurant chain collapse

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/11...nt-brexit-news