Reply
Page 17 of 17 FirstFirst ... 9 14 15 16 17
Like Tree91Likes

Xinjiang — ethnic minorities — “transformation through education.”

  1. #161

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    猴山
    Posts
    13,310
    Quote Originally Posted by civil_servant
    It wasn't adopted. The vision was laid out in 2012. The policy was drafted in 2013, and laws were enacted starting in 2014.

    You're confused as always because of a variable called t. It stands for "time". Whether that's for drafting laws, policies, or building infrastructure. You seem to really struggle with that concept.
    Yes you are right. The building of interment camps on a massive scale doesn't date back to 2012. The document is not a pleasant read.

  2. #162

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    603
    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile
    Here is another one time offer, do not compare things to the holocaust unless you have clear and unrefutable evidence.
    Hmmm...

    Not sure you.get to tell me what to say or think on this. Maybe you do, maybe you don't.

  3. #163

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Pampanga, Philippines
    Posts
    17,238
    Quote Originally Posted by juanalias
    Hmmm...

    Not sure you.get to tell me what to say or think on this. Maybe you do, maybe you don't.
    If you are able to tell people what they should think then the reverse must also apply. To compare these camps, from the little we know of them, to the extermination camps is not justified IMO.

  4. #164

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    603

    Ok. Turns out you can't tell me what to say or think on this one. I thought you might be a nexpert on the holocaust and things like it. I'm not seeing that now. Maybe we both have only our opinions.
    Works for me.


  5. #165

    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    8,525

    Discussed this with hubby this morning. This is his theory - that they are basically rounding up pretty much everyone, putting them in a camp and then effectively "testing" them to see who is a radical. (Doing a lot of language lessons and retraining at the same time, pretty efficient). Anyone who is spotted as being radical then gets moved to a "re-education" facility or whatever. So probably most of these "camps" are fairly benign, a few are pretty nasty.

    Reading the article linked by Civil Servant above, the strategies for de-radicalisation were quite interesting. On the face of it, no worse than what they have been doing to Christians in China for years. We all know China is a fundamentally "anti religious" society. Worship the CCP as your God, or else. As someone who thinks that religion is pretty backward and tends to result in people who lack the ability to think rationally, I would probably have agreed with some of these strategies a few years back.

    However, you have to factor the "people" factor into this. People who are co-ersed into doing things they don't want to do (such as have their culture or religion taken away from them) tend to cling more strongly to it. Where has the radicalisation of the middle east come from? At least some from a reaction to American invasions and the forced introduction of democracy and the actions around the world to "ban the burqua" and similar. They feel their religion is under threat so they backlash.

    No different to white rednecks in the USA backlashing against perceptions of political correctness and "triggered" snowflakes.

    So if you really want to deradicalise, you need to do it VERY carefully. Free language classes are fine - forced to speak the language not fine. Vocational training - fine ; forced internment to be free labour - not fine. The bit about Cosmetic Fairs to make the women want to not wear veils nearly had me spewing. Goodness if there are some bits of western craziness and commercialism that really don't need to be pushed onto people who have not already grasped it!

    And while I think that religion is silly and irrational, it does appear to be a stabilising force in many places. Many (not all, but many) religious "rules" (be good to your neighbour, feed the poor etc etc) are good for society generally and a religious society is often a cohesive society. I wish humans could cohere around a general moral code without there being a "god" behind it, but the evidence is weak for that right now! So the CCP needs to be careful what it wishes for..... a society of people who believe they have been invaded but no longer care about their fellow man might be more dangerous than what they started with.


  6. #166

    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    519

    Little Sunday morning philosophy.

    It provides such a beautifully simple way to test ways of thinking and courses of action.


Reply
Page 17 of 17 FirstFirst ... 9 14 15 16 17