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  • 1 Post By Rob2020
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  • 1 Post By SpeakCantonese

Electric Scooters (and charging culture) in USA

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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Electric Scooters (and charging culture) in USA


  2. #2

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    Amazing.

    I love the idea of getting around town on one of those things, but totally inappropriate for me in HK (In/around Central)

    Really curious how it might work out in other places though, I can see them being adopted nicely in places like Copenhagen.

    Kowloon Goon likes this.

  3. #3

    Join Date
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    Figured out what this bird hunting thing is:

    Birds are available in a growing number of American cities including Austin, Texas; Nashville, Tennessee; Los Angeles; San Francisco; Scottsdale, Arizona; Washington D.C.; and Atlanta. The scooters are all battery-powered and dockless, so they can be picked up or dropped off anywhere.

    But when night falls, what most riders don’t realize is that the scooters themselves are charged by a contract workforce. These people are known as “Bird hunters” or “chargers,” and they’re growing exponentially in number.
    Wonder if the local bike pickups (and return to those mythical bike racks outside MTR stations) could be outsourced in a similar manner to GoGoVan type outfits....

  4. #4

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    My biggest issue with all these electric contraptions is that they are completely silent, often go too fast and there are no or limited regulations in terms of training. When you get kids on the streets going 20-40km/hr with zero training, it's a recipe for disaster. I can't imagine these things in busy Hong Kong.

    Fiona in HKG likes this.

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golem:
    My biggest issue with all these electric contraptions is that they are completely silent...
    For sure and that's been a concern since 2007 when the hybrid vehicles were gaining traction:

    https://www.newscientist.com/blog/te...t-killers.html

    Would like to see a breakdown of “electric/hybrid” versus “non-electric” vehicles involved in pedestrian fatalities, but Hong Kong’s Transport Department doesn’t seem to differentiate that (last reported 2016):

    Transport Department - Year 2016

    Also, related:

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/may/06/new-law-combats-silent-menace-electric-cars
    From July next year, all new electric and hybrid models seeking approval in Europe will have to emit a noise when travelling at low speeds. Existing vehicles are expected gradually to be retrofitted with devices.
    Maybe electric bikes and scooters can have sensors installed to generate noise when they operate at certain speeds and in certain areas.

  6. #6

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    Jan 2018
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    In China, they are all over the place. On one hand, it's nice to get rid of the noise pollution but because of the poor driving standards and the fact they ride these things on bike lanes, sidewalks and sometimes quite fast, it does become dangerous. In Vietnam, a lot of kids travel on electric scooters to go to school and some of them appear to be very young. I can't imagine, they have any kind of license or training so it makes it dangerous.


  7. #7

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    I think they should be legal here in Hong Kong...

    Simple solutions... limit the speed, fix some device to them that makes a sound... sick of hearing NO, NO, NO...

    Hong Kong is not special... the traffic here is nowhere near as bad as it is in many western cities and car drivers should be forced to accommodate... I reckon, give that it's virtually free transport, that e-scooters would get many out of their cars... I would commute on one if it was legal.

    Skyhook likes this.

  8. #8

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    In China, they are all over the place.
    So provide parking and special lanes.

    On one hand, it's nice to get rid of the noise pollution but because of the poor driving standards and the fact they ride these things on bike lanes, sidewalks and sometimes quite fast, it does become dangerous.
    Regulate the speed... and, lots of things are dangerous... what are the benefits? Perhaps the benefits outweigh the negatives... in my view, they do... by miles.

    In Vietnam, a lot of kids travel on electric scooters to go to school and some of them appear to be very young. I can't imagine, they have any kind of license or training so it makes it dangerous.
    So train them.


  9. #9

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    Of course, if you treat these scooters like motorbikes, add some noise and issue licenses with required training to appropriate age users and they ride in traffic as they should. I think they are fine. Unfortunately that is not the case in most places. If they are to go on bike lanes then the speed and weight of these need to be limited.