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China Trade War - Tarrifs, Tarrifs and more Tarrifs

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  1. #191

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyhook
    Ha ha now that really is the kettle calling the pot black ! When you look at the combined finance elite of this world, they are all shady if you were privileged enough to sit in on what really goes on in closed room boardrooms across the world.

    ' The Secret of a great success for which you are at a loss to account is a crime that has never been found out, because it was properly executed.' - Honoré de Balzac

    Also what Steve says ( he has lived and worked in Shanghai so he has ' some ' experience ) he mentions a very relevant book as he talks on this clip, "Unrestricted Warfare by Qiao Liang & Wang Xiangsui." A pretty relevant book in my opinion as it does correlate a distinct course trajectory, as the west has systematically deindustrialised itself, albeit losing its manufacturing independence / skills base, quite rapidly over the last 20 years. Not a good position to be in

    Let's see how the next decade unfolds, my personal gut feeling is it is going to be a pretty rough ride between 2020 - 2030.
    Well, I remain highly skeptical of Bannon. So he has lived in Shanghai, but that does not say much these days. More and more foreigners have lived in the big cities of China, but that does not necessarily mean they know the country well. He can selectively quote books advocating so and so position, but does those books really reflect what Beijing is thinking?

    He has a shady reputation and a questionable agenda. It is true he has highlighted some trends in globalization that has resulted in a shift in manufacturing and the resulting adverse impact on the blue collar working class. But it seems to me that he is exploiting these issues for his own nefarious ends.
    Last edited by Coolboy; 28-08-2019 at 11:27 AM.
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  2. #192

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    Trump’s New Trade War Tool Might Just Be Antique China Debt


    The Trump administration has been studying the unlikely prospect of reviving century-old claims on Chinese bonds sold before the founding of the communist People’s Republic.

    The Hukuang Railway bond is a thing of beauty. Printed with an ornate border and carrying a large chop, the debt was sold in 1911 to help fund construction of a rail line stretching from Hankou to Szechuan.

    The U.S. once referred to the money that flowed into China at the turn of the 20th century as “dollar diplomacy”—a way of building relations with the country (and its massive untapped market) by helping it industrialize.

    “The People’s Republic of China dismisses its defaulted sovereign obligations as pre-1949 Republic of China debt, but doing so contradicts the PRC’s claim that it is sole successor to the ROC’s sovereign rights,”

    She argues that China is in selective default, having paid out on bonds held by British investors in 1987 as part of the Hong Kong handover deal negotiated by former Prime Minister and ‘Irony Lady’ Margaret Thatcher. If China doesn’t pay out, she says, it should be blocked from selling new debt in international markets. By Bianco’s reckoning, China now owes more than $1 trillion on the defaulted debt, once adjusted for inflation, interest, and other damages—a sum roughly equivalent to China’s holdings of U.S. Treasuries.

    “What’s wrong with paying China with their own paper?” says Bianco.
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  3. #193

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    Quote Originally Posted by civil_servant
    It was given to them. They voted it down. Now they complain.
    Universal Suffrage was not given to Hong Kong. One Man One Vote was given with pre-screened candidates. This is worse than now as it offers a veneer of legitimacy to people who are keen to please the dictator in charge.
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  4. #194

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    Question: How does Bolton's departure change the odds of a trade deal in 2019?


  5. #195

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    I have always thought the trade war was meant to pressure China politically not necessarily for any trade deal. Why boost a country who ultimately is your enemy? This is classic Bolton and Bannon thinking. AND THEY ARE NOT WRONG. Now the Orange one is getting cold feet because of losing Midwest heartland support. More failure due to the democratic process. Ultimately just pander to the voters. No balls.

    Last edited by jonastainine; 11-09-2019 at 12:30 PM.

  6. #196

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonastainine
    I have always thought the trade war was meant to pressure China. Why boost a country who ultimately is your enemy? This is classic Bolton and Bannon thinking. AND THEY ARE NOT WRONG. Now the Orange one is getting cold feet because of losing Midwest heartland support. More failure due to the democratic process. Ultimately just pander to the voters. No balls.
    Because ultimately we all have to share the same planet. Talk is better than war for everyone 99% of the time.

  7. #197

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    And we dont' want to hurt the feelings of 1.4B people on the anniversary of Oct 1st.

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/...25717988388865


  8. #198

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    Good riddance to Bolton - not sure it helps the US-China trade war, but someone is happy

    https://twitter.com/azarijahromi/sta...84074734542849


  9. #199

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    Quote Originally Posted by shri
    Question: How does Bolton's departure change the odds of a trade deal in 2019?
    I don't know if it will have much of an impact. The rest of his administration are still filled with hardliners on China. They simply can read Trump's mind better than Bolton, hence can adapt better than Bolton could to the shifting mood of the president.

    Trump may also have been angered by almost stumbling into a full-blown war with Iran, something which he does not want in an approaching election year. It was Bolton who championed the hardline regime change approach to Iran by advising Trump to shred the nuclear arms deal. So Trump may have blamed Bolton for the Iran fiasco.

    Bottom line, the election may decide Trump's approach to China than any one adviser.

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