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Ghosn ... what happened?

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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrgoodkat:
    Any country's embassy will issue you a new passport, just say the old one got lost. Doesn't help much when leaving Japan though since it has your name and date of birth on it, that's why they had to smuggle him into the plane.
    Sadly not the British Embassy. Now it's all centralised, apply online and get the passport in the post a few weeks later.
    mrgoodkat likes this.

  2. #32

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    Three questions I want to know.

    1.The Renault-Nissan alliance. Nissan will do fine. The hard work Ghosn made in his years there has put the automaker on a firm footing. The question is what of it's alliance with Renault? This alliance is not a merger as I understand it, but a cross-sharing arrangement with Ghosn holding everything together. With him gone, the future stability of this alliance is a big question mark. After all, there are rumours of Ghosn's removal not simply because of the crime he alleged to have committed, but because the Japanese did not like his ideas about the future plans of the alliance. And what about the French? Are they willing to continue an alliance when the Japanese threw their guy under the bus? And also don't forget Mitsubishi, arguably the weakest Japanese automaker. It was struggling and likely would have gone bankrupt had Nissan not bought a controlling share of the company in 2016.

    2. Did Ghosn really masterminded this Hollywood-style escape while under 24 hours survelliance? Either the Japanese agree in secret to let him escape (I don't know why they would do this, but there are a variety of possibilities, to maintain relations with the French, etc). Or the Japanese were caught flat-footed and their secuity wasn't really all that great.

    3. Will any foreigner want to run a major Japanese cooperation again after this? I know Mazda, when it was under Ford ownership, had American managers running as the CEO, and it seem to have worked well there, turning around Mazda's losses to profits. But is that maybe more of an exception? What's the future for Gaijin senior managers or CEOs in Japan? My guess: Yes, there will still be gaijins around, although they might have second thoughts about it now.

    Last edited by Coolboy; 01-01-2020 at 11:32 AM.

  3. #33

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    Did he move musical instruments in and out of the house on a regular basis? Host concerts in his home? Wouldn't moving some huge case out of the house be suspicious? Air holes? Can't wait for the movie!

    Coolboy and dengxi like this.

  4. #34

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  5. #35

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by DimSumBond:
    Asian countries are notorious for how opaque their laws, governance and processes are. And then we get to enforcement of such. I believe Japan will be the most difficult place in Asia to navigate through. Followed by Korea and China.
    Don't agree - Singapore and HK laws both follow UK conventions, and are fair and transparent. You might not agree with the punishment metted out (eg caning in Singapore) but it's their country their laws.

  7. #37

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by threelittlepigs:
    Singapore laws follow UK conventions, and are fair and transparent. You might not agree with the punishment metted out (eg caning in Singapore) but it's their country their laws.
    Err.. have u seen how they
    1. set the law
    2. appoint the judges
    3. interpret the law according to the situation

    not sure how you call that fair and square..
    drawing analogy, the japanese can say their law is fair and transparent as well, just interpreted in their own internal ways...
    CharSiuNow likes this.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    Op/Ed From Ex-Prosecutor: Ghosn must respect Japanese Justice Statistics – Japan Subculture Research Center
    It is most regrettable that Carlos Ghosn, the convicted criminal, former CEO of Nissan has cowardly chosen to escape from Japan rather than face a fair trial and inevitable conviction in Japan’s prestigious courts. This is very disruptive of our justice system and the prosecutor conviction statistics.
    I lol'ed

    Edit: it took me a couple to paragraphs to appreciate the full sarcasm, but this guy is brilliant. I think I'll spend this quiet morning reading a couple more of his blogs, he is good.
    Last edited by CharSiuNow; 02-01-2020 at 10:49 AM.
    shri likes this.

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by freeier:
    Err.. have u seen how they
    1. set the law
    2. appoint the judges
    3. interpret the law according to the situation

    not sure how you call that fair and square..
    drawing analogy, the japanese can say their law is fair and transparent as well, just interpreted in their own internal ways...
    Without mentioning a single example...

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