Political convictions.

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  1. #1

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    Political convictions.

    Gun culture in the US finds another victim, this time the police officer who shot Daunte Wright.

    With all the convictions based solely on politics here, it’s a little concerning to see that the US is not immune to social politics skewing its judicial process.

    This definitely feels like a major miscarriage of justice to me.

    Daunte Wright death: US 'Taser mixup' ex-officer guilty of manslaughter https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-59776917


  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage:
    Gun culture in the US finds another victim, this time the police officer who shot Daunte Wright.
    How exactly is she the victim here?

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage:
    Gun culture in the US finds another victim, this time the police officer who shot Daunte Wright.

    With all the convictions based solely on politics here, it’s a little concerning to see that the US is not immune to social politics skewing its judicial process.

    This definitely feels like a major miscarriage of justice to me.

    Daunte Wright death: US 'Taser mixup' ex-officer guilty of manslaughter https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-59776917
    Far from a straightforward case but all the evidence was given in the trial and a verdict reached based on all the evidence. There is certainly enough evidence to not paint her as a helpless victim.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile:
    Far from a straightforward case but all the evidence was given in the trial and a verdict reached based on all the evidence. There is certainly enough evidence to not paint her as a helpless victim.
    She is not 'the hapless victim' clearly.

    If she had tasered him, would she have committed a crime?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage:
    She is not 'the hapless victim' clearly.

    If she had tasered him, would she have committed a crime?
    No, but that is unlikely to have killed him.

    I have held and fired a gun only once. I have held a taser once. I have no police training nor experience. Yet I am pretty sure I could tell which I was holding.

    I think there is a strong case for saying she killed him because of criminal negligence therefore involuntary manslaughter.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile:
    No, but that is unlikely to have killed him.

    I have held and fired a gun only once. I have held a taser once. I have no police training nor experience. Yet I am pretty sure I could tell which I was holding.

    I think there is a strong case for saying she killed him because of criminal negligence therefore involuntary manslaughter.
    It’s almost guaranteed not to have killed him, but it would’ve undoubtedly been assault and a decent likelihood of actual bodily harm, so why is that not a criminal offence?

    As for being able to differentiate between a taser and a gun, I’m damn sure I could tell which I was holding too,…. Until that one time, under pressure, having a bad day, another young black man possibly a gangbanger resisting arrest for gun crimes, split-second decisions, at the end of a 26 year career that has otherwise been well conducted and morally upstanding.

    Are you seriously trying to tell me, that you’ve never once said about yourself “I could’ve sworn I……”

    These aren’t Crack SAS were talking here: You take an average woman, on the force for decades, give her occasional training, send her out into the field that is absolutely awash with guns, arresting people every week, who are younger, faster, stronger with much less to lose and you’re expected to be fucking Robocop, and never make a mistake?

    Let’s face facts, she made a major mistake, a career ending mistake, a criminal mistake?

    You do know she was convicted of first-degree manslaughter right, as well as second-degree manslaughter?

    FYI first-degree manslaughter is applied to cases in which the defendant causes someone's death while attempting to commit a lesser crime. Are you suggesting she was attempting to commit a crime when she accidentally shot him?
    Last edited by Sage; 25-12-2021 at 07:57 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage:
    It’s almost guaranteed not to have killed him, but it would’ve undoubtedly been assault and a decent likelihood of actual bodily harm, so why is that not a criminal offence?

    As for being able to differentiate between a taser and a gun, I’m damn sure I could tell which I was holding too,…. Until that one time, under pressure, having a bad day, another young black man possibly a gangbanger resisting arrest for gun crimes, split-second decisions, at the end of a 26 year career that has otherwise been well conducted and morally upstanding.

    Are you seriously trying to tell me, that you’ve never once said about yourself “I could’ve sworn I……”

    These aren’t Crack SAS were talking here: You take an average woman, on the force for decades, give her occasional training, send her out into the field that is absolutely awash with guns, arresting people every week, who are younger, faster, stronger with much less to lose and you’re expected to be fucking Robocop, and never make a mistake?
    That is what the jury found. Not that juries are never wrong, but I can see why they reached their decision. Clearly you know better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile:
    That is what the jury found. Not that juries are never wrong, but I can see why they reached their decision. Clearly you know better.
    Yes correct, juries are sometimes wrong, and juries are sometimes overly influenced by the politics of the day. Which are both exactly what has happened here.

    P.s. Note my edit above re: first degree manslaughter.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage:
    Yes correct, juries are sometimes wrong, and juries are sometimes overly influenced by the politics of the day. Which are both exactly what has happened here.

    P.s. Note my edit above re: first degree manslaughter.
    Merry Christmas sage. As with covid you know better than everyone else even when you are obviously wrong I wonder if you would be so certain and so upset with the decision if the skin colours were reversed?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage:
    FYI first-degree manslaughter is applied to cases in which the defendant causes someone's death while attempting to commit a lesser crime. Are you suggesting she was attempting to commit a crime when she accidentally shot him?
    This seems to be an overly broad reading of MN law regarding manslaughter 1st. All the defendant has to do is " commit an act with intent to cause fear in another of immediate bodily harm or death." So: "taser! taser!" is the act of causing fear precipitating what came next. See the MN law here (section 2):

    https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/cite/609.20

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