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To the Moon - Artemis (Apollo's Twin Sister) Set to Launch

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  1. #1

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    To the Moon - Artemis (Apollo's Twin Sister) Set to Launch

    Nasa begins its journey to put man back on the moon, in about less than 24 hours..

    The 322-foot (98-meter) Space Launch System rocket is the most powerful ever built by NASA. It’s poised to send an empty crew capsule into lunar orbit, a half-century after NASA’s Apollo program, which landed 12 astronauts on the moon.

    Astronauts could return to the moon in a few years, if this six-week test flight goes well. NASA officials caution, however, that the risks are high and the flight could be cut short.

    In lieu of astronauts, three test dummies are strapped into the Orion capsule to measure vibration, acceleration and radiation, one of the biggest hazards to humans in deep space. The capsule alone has more than 1,000 sensors.
    https://apnews.com/article/moon-rock...20cd5a03ed6a91
    Rob2020 likes this.

  2. #2

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    Shaun the Sheep will be aboard too.

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  3. #3

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    That this is exciting in 2022 despite being essentially the same mission as Apollo 8 in 1968 (minus the astronauts) really puts the scale of the earlier achievement into perspective.

    shri, hullexile, north2 and 5 others like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    Shaun the Sheep will be aboard too.
    Learn something new everyday..


    "We're very happy he's been selected for the mission and we understand, although it might be a small step for a human, it's a giant leap for lambkind."
    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-bristol-62574580

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peaky:
    That this is exciting in 2022 despite being essentially the same mission as Apollo 8 in 1968 (minus the astronauts) really puts the scale of the earlier achievement into perspective.
    Or what a unusual year 2020++ is..

    Something else some of us get excited about... The earliest electric car was driven in 1890s...

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    I hope they've learnt something from "For All Mankind"


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    Quote Originally Posted by Peaky:
    That this is exciting in 2022 despite being essentially the same mission as Apollo 8 in 1968 (minus the astronauts) really puts the scale of the earlier achievement into perspective.
    I think people are excited because this time it's expected to be for real, not a fake moon landing like in 1968...


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    Quote Originally Posted by Philips:
    I think people are excited because this time it's expected to be for real, not a fake moon landing like in 1968...

    Ah but how do you know this time it's for real? Just Shaun as a witness.

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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile:
    Ah but how do you know this time it's for real? Just Shaun as a witness.
    They seem to be doing serious tests on the technology they said they used successfully in 1968. If it was another fake moon landing, why would they have to test it? They could just say it worked perfectly well, so they are using it again.

    From the BBC:

    Engineers are most concerned to see that Orion's heatshield will cope with the extreme temperatures it will encounter on re-entry to Earth's atmosphere.

    Orion will be coming in very fast - at 38,000km/h (24,000mph), or 32 times the speed of sound.

    "Even the reinforced carbon-carbon that protected the shuttle was only good for around 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit (1,600C)," said Mike Hawes, the Orion programme manager at aerospace manufacturer Lockheed Martin.

    "Now, we're coming in at more than 4,000 degrees (2,200C). We've gone back to the Apollo ablative material called Avcoat. It's in blocks with a gap filler, and testing that is a high priority."



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