Language discrimination

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  1. #51

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    in the opinion of many people here, people who were not born here are second to best. And many think they are still the best of the best.

    however, this is also the trend in shanghai......

    What exactly are these people who consider themselves true Hkers proud of about themselves?


  2. #52

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    GEOexpats....better close your site if you have a damn DISCRIMINATION problem ok? This site don't treat people so equal.This site is rubbish.


  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by khaygee:
    GEOexpats....better close your site if you have a damn DISCRIMINATION problem ok? This site don't treat people so equal.This site is rubbish.
    Yes of course. By the way this thread is over a year old, about the age you are by your post.

  4. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by khaygee:
    GEOexpats....better close your site if you have a damn DISCRIMINATION problem ok? This site don't treat people so equal.This site is rubbish.
    Huh?

    This site treats everybody the same as long as you abide by the forum rules so I don't know why you're making this an issue when its not.

  5. #55

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    It's an interesting thread to revive though, given the recent discrimination bill (which I don't really understand). Does anyone? Will it change anything?

    I was wondering the other day what the definition of a "local" is - is, for example, the child of an expat who was born and grew up here, went to local school, speaks fluent Cantonese, now a "local". I guess from the discussions in the thread, old though they may be, the answer is no, even though so many of the "locals" here originally hail from Guangdong! Crazy huh.


  6. #56

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    Yeah, interesting coming upon this ol' thread on language discrimination - from a job-fit angle...

    Off at a tangent, I'd agree that it's an ODD biz-ness this sometimes BLURRY definition of who's "local" or not.

    Many teenagers I know, moved across here with their families from Guangdong (Guangzhou, Foshan, etc) about 6-10 years ago. And whenever the talk is about "mainlanders", e.g. heavily-pregnant mothers using HK hospital services at the expense of "true"(?) locals, and some skipping payment after getting their babies the much-sought-after birth certs, it's obvious they feel uncomfortable when others, HK-born OR who've just been in HK longer, start negatively whinging on 'bout these "free-loaders".

    BUT, as pointed out, HKers are made up of those from UP North of the border AND elsewhere...

    Weird, shifting senses... just whenever it suits a group, at whatever point in time


  7. #57
    er2
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    Quote Originally Posted by MovingIn07:
    I was wondering the other day what the definition of a "local" is - is, for example, the child of an expat who was born and grew up here, went to local school, speaks fluent Cantonese, now a "local". I guess from the discussions in the thread, old though they may be, the answer is no, even though so many of the "locals" here originally hail from Guangdong! Crazy huh.
    Same as in many places all over the world. The more mono-ethnical a place is, the less people are willing to accept someone with different looks as local. There is a huge degree of xenophobia in rural areas of (esp. eastern) Germany - those part that virtually have no immigrants - and on the occasion, people from there moving to bigger cities, say, Cologne keep that attitude. I once enjoyed witnessing a discussion between a Germany-born German guy of Greek ancestry and a guy from Saxony that evolved around this 'local' issue. In the end the 'Greek' guy pointed out that he had (FRG-) German citizenship since birth, born to (FRG-) German parents, while the Saxon guy only acquired it through re-unification in 1990.... but to some people, color of hair, skin and eyes (and maybe religion) will always matter more. And while I've not personally experienced it _everywhere_, I'm sure it is the same in any part of the world that doesn't have a significant _assimilated_ immigrant population.

  8. #58
    jgl
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    Interesting how even the most random of mini-rants can turn into an interesting discussion.

    A couple of years ago, I read that there are two generalised views on nationality which is often split along country lines. In Germany and much of Asia, nationality = ethnicity. Whereas in the UK or France, nationality is to a larger degree a set of cultural attitudes.


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